Rosemary Chicken and Brie En Croute!
…aka Chicken Sandwich Thing

Rosemary Chicken and Brie En Croute!
…aka Chicken Sandwich Thing

"It’s messing people up, this social pressure to “find your passion” and “know what it is you want to do”. It’s perfectly fine to just live your moments fully, and marvel as many small and large passions, many small and large purposes enter and leave your life. For many people there is no realization, no bliss to follow, no discovery of your life’s purpose. This isn’t sad, it’s just the way things are. Stop trying to find the forest and just enjoy the trees."

Sally Coulter (via timedoesnotexisthere)
loki-has-a-tardis:

This is honestly the best poster I have found in a while supporting breast cancer awareness. I am honestly so sick of seeing, “set the tatas free” and “save the boobies”. There is no reason in hell a life threatening, life ruining disease should be sexualized. “Don’t wear a bra day,” go fuck yourselves. You’re not saving a pair of tits, you’re saving the entire package: mind, body, and soul included. Women are not just a pair of breasts.

loki-has-a-tardis:

This is honestly the best poster I have found in a while supporting breast cancer awareness. I am honestly so sick of seeing, “set the tatas free” and “save the boobies”. There is no reason in hell a life threatening, life ruining disease should be sexualized. “Don’t wear a bra day,” go fuck yourselves. You’re not saving a pair of tits, you’re saving the entire package: mind, body, and soul included. Women are not just a pair of breasts.

Spent the week with this little lady!

Spent the week with this little lady!

expose-the-light:

Beautiful Chemistry: Amazing Chemical Reactions by Yan Liang

fuckyeahcollegeprepping:

natashasledger:

my problem is that i like boys in theory but not in practice so if i see a cute boy i’m like “damn i would” but when faced with actually dating one i’m just like “nah”

This is it. This is how I explain it. I have found it.

neurosciencestuff:

Myth-conceptions: How myths about the brain are hampering teaching
Teachers in the UK, Holland, Turkey, Greece and China were presented with seven so-called ‘neuromyths’ and asked whether they believe them to be true.
A quarter or more of teachers in the UK and Turkey believe a student’s brain would shrink if they drank less than six to eight glasses of water a day, while around half or more of those surveyed believe a student’s brain is only 10 per cent active and that children are less attentive after sugary drinks and snacks.
Over 70 per cent of teachers in all countries wrongly believe a student is either left-brained or right-brained, peaking at 91 per cent in the UK.
And almost all teachers (over 90 per cent in each country) feel that teaching to a student’s preferred learning style - auditory, kinaesthetic or visual - is helpful, despite no convincing evidence to support this approach.
The new research from the University of Bristol, published in Nature Reviews Neuroscience, calls for better communication between neuroscientists and educators.
Dr Paul Howard-Jones, author of the article from Bristol University’s Graduate School of Education, said: “These ideas are often sold to teachers as based on neuroscience – but modern neuroscience cannot be used support them. These ideas have no educational value and are often associated with poor practice in the classroom.”
The report blames wishfulness, anxiety and a bias towards simple explanations as typical factors that distort neuroscientific fact into neuromyth.
Such factors also appear to be hampering recent efforts of neuroscientists to communicate the true meaning of their work to educators.
Dr Howard-Jones added: “Although the increased dialogue between neuroscience and education is encouraging, we see new neuromyths on the horizon and old ones returning in new forms.
“Sometimes, transmitting ‘boiled-down’ messages about the brain to educators can just lead to misunderstanding, and confusions about concepts such as brain plasticity are common in discussions about education policy.”
The report highlights several areas where new findings from neuroscience are becoming misinterpreted by education, including brain-related ideas regarding early educational investment, adolescent brain development and learning disorders such as dyslexia and ADHD.
Hopes that education will draw genuine benefit from neuroscience may rest on a new but rapidly growing field of ‘neuroeducational’ research that combines both fields.
The review concludes that, in the future, such collaboration will be greatly needed if education is to be enriched rather than misled by neuroscience.

neurosciencestuff:

Myth-conceptions: How myths about the brain are hampering teaching

Teachers in the UK, Holland, Turkey, Greece and China were presented with seven so-called ‘neuromyths’ and asked whether they believe them to be true.

A quarter or more of teachers in the UK and Turkey believe a student’s brain would shrink if they drank less than six to eight glasses of water a day, while around half or more of those surveyed believe a student’s brain is only 10 per cent active and that children are less attentive after sugary drinks and snacks.

Over 70 per cent of teachers in all countries wrongly believe a student is either left-brained or right-brained, peaking at 91 per cent in the UK.

And almost all teachers (over 90 per cent in each country) feel that teaching to a student’s preferred learning style - auditory, kinaesthetic or visual - is helpful, despite no convincing evidence to support this approach.

The new research from the University of Bristol, published in Nature Reviews Neuroscience, calls for better communication between neuroscientists and educators.

Dr Paul Howard-Jones, author of the article from Bristol University’s Graduate School of Education, said: “These ideas are often sold to teachers as based on neuroscience – but modern neuroscience cannot be used support them. These ideas have no educational value and are often associated with poor practice in the classroom.”

The report blames wishfulness, anxiety and a bias towards simple explanations as typical factors that distort neuroscientific fact into neuromyth.

Such factors also appear to be hampering recent efforts of neuroscientists to communicate the true meaning of their work to educators.

Dr Howard-Jones added: “Although the increased dialogue between neuroscience and education is encouraging, we see new neuromyths on the horizon and old ones returning in new forms.

“Sometimes, transmitting ‘boiled-down’ messages about the brain to educators can just lead to misunderstanding, and confusions about concepts such as brain plasticity are common in discussions about education policy.”

The report highlights several areas where new findings from neuroscience are becoming misinterpreted by education, including brain-related ideas regarding early educational investment, adolescent brain development and learning disorders such as dyslexia and ADHD.

Hopes that education will draw genuine benefit from neuroscience may rest on a new but rapidly growing field of ‘neuroeducational’ research that combines both fields.

The review concludes that, in the future, such collaboration will be greatly needed if education is to be enriched rather than misled by neuroscience.

supershanee:

miniature—oasis:

pandera:

pikaontour:

so punny i could cry

this was the first stall that we went to, and it was great because everything had a pun on it LOL

supershanee

"Unfortunately, the worst part of the situation has indeed been the news media. Radio stations suggested that Ebola would be spread far and wide around Kent and Cleveland, that the plane the patient flew on should have been nuked and never used again, baggage handlers at Cleveland Hopkins International Airport should be quarantined because “they may have touched her suitcase” and that everyone was at risk, no matter how tenuous their connection to the area and the patient.

This simply is not true."

7 Things I Wish Parents Would Stop Teaching Their Children:

goddess-river:

  1. That nudity is inherently sexual
  2. That people should be judged for their personal decisions
  3. That yelling solves problems
  4. That they are too young to be talking about the things they’re already starting to ask questions about
  5. That age correlates to importance
  6. That interacting with someone of the opposite sex is inherently romantic
  7. That the default for someone is straight and cisgender
  • me when it starts getting cloudy: yeees
  • me when it starts raining: yeeeEEEEEEEEEEEEESSSS
liam-r:

theosos:

gifak-net:

[video]

how do they even survive in the wild?

That’s your “be bigger than your predator pose”. It doesn’t work but it’s cute <3 

liam-r:

theosos:

gifak-net:

[video]

how do they even survive in the wild?

That’s your “be bigger than your predator pose”. It doesn’t work but it’s cute <3 

Today marks the day I made perhaps the best pun of my life and decided on what my first tattoo will be! What a great start to the day! Hopefully belt testing and an attempt to hem my pants go as swimmingly.