tardistype221b:

badwolflaurel:

pandafreakforlife:

I hate when the media makes The Hunger Games look like a battle for love. Get your bullshit fantasies away. This is about murder, over powered government, and a girl trying to change the way things are. News flash not every girls fantasy is to find true love.

the irony here is that our media is doing exactly what the Capitol did in the books; downplaying the murder, focusing on the bullshit love story

That’s not irony, that’s just plain scary

More Tigger!

More Tigger!

Thoughts and change. SOON.

lord-doctor:

supertrout95:

"im going to be an adult and do adult things and be responsible and grown up"

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This is literally me at any point in the day

neurosciencestuff:

Xenon gas protects the brain after head injury
Head injury is the leading cause of death and disability in people aged under 45 in developed countries, mostly resulting from falls and road accidents. The primary injury caused by the initial mechanical force is followed by a secondary injury which develops in the hours and days afterwards. This secondary injury is largely responsible for patients’ mental and physical disabilities, but there are currently no drug treatments that can be given after the accident to stop it from occurring.
Scientists at Imperial College London found that xenon, given within hours of the initial injury, limits brain damage and improves neurological outcomes in mice, both in the short term and long term. The findings, published in the journal Critical Care Medicine, could lead to clinical trials of xenon as a treatment for head injury in humans.
Although xenon is chemically inert, this does not mean it is biologically inactive. Xenon has been known to have general anaesthetic properties since the 1950s. Previous studies at Imperial have found that xenon can protect brain cells from mechanical injury in the lab, but this new study is the first time such an effect has been shown in live animals, a vital step before any new treatments can be tested in humans.
Mice were anaesthetised before having a controlled mechanical force applied to the brain. Some were then treated with xenon at different concentrations and at different times after injury.
Mice treated with xenon performed better in tests assessing their neurological deficits, such as movement and balance problems, in the days after injury and after one month. They also had less brain damage, even if treatment was delayed up to three hours after the injury.
Dr Robert Dickinson from the Department of Surgery and Cancer at Imperial College London, who led the study, said: “After a blow to the head, most of the damage to the brain doesn’t occur immediately but in the hours and days afterwards. At present we have no specific drugs to limit the spread of the secondary injury, but we think that is the key to successful treatment.
“This study shows that xenon can prevent brain damage and disability in mice, and crucially it’s effective when given up to at least three hours after the injury. It’s feasible that someone who hits their head in an accident could be treated in the hospital or in an ambulance in this timeframe.
“These findings provide crucial evidence to support doing clinical trials in humans.”

neurosciencestuff:

Xenon gas protects the brain after head injury

Head injury is the leading cause of death and disability in people aged under 45 in developed countries, mostly resulting from falls and road accidents. The primary injury caused by the initial mechanical force is followed by a secondary injury which develops in the hours and days afterwards. This secondary injury is largely responsible for patients’ mental and physical disabilities, but there are currently no drug treatments that can be given after the accident to stop it from occurring.

Scientists at Imperial College London found that xenon, given within hours of the initial injury, limits brain damage and improves neurological outcomes in mice, both in the short term and long term. The findings, published in the journal Critical Care Medicine, could lead to clinical trials of xenon as a treatment for head injury in humans.

Although xenon is chemically inert, this does not mean it is biologically inactive. Xenon has been known to have general anaesthetic properties since the 1950s. Previous studies at Imperial have found that xenon can protect brain cells from mechanical injury in the lab, but this new study is the first time such an effect has been shown in live animals, a vital step before any new treatments can be tested in humans.

Mice were anaesthetised before having a controlled mechanical force applied to the brain. Some were then treated with xenon at different concentrations and at different times after injury.

Mice treated with xenon performed better in tests assessing their neurological deficits, such as movement and balance problems, in the days after injury and after one month. They also had less brain damage, even if treatment was delayed up to three hours after the injury.

Dr Robert Dickinson from the Department of Surgery and Cancer at Imperial College London, who led the study, said: “After a blow to the head, most of the damage to the brain doesn’t occur immediately but in the hours and days afterwards. At present we have no specific drugs to limit the spread of the secondary injury, but we think that is the key to successful treatment.

“This study shows that xenon can prevent brain damage and disability in mice, and crucially it’s effective when given up to at least three hours after the injury. It’s feasible that someone who hits their head in an accident could be treated in the hospital or in an ambulance in this timeframe.

“These findings provide crucial evidence to support doing clinical trials in humans.”

Come 2017, the contraception landscape might look very, very different. 

Vasalgel, an up-and-coming non-hormonal form of birth control for men, announced in a press release last week that its preclinical trials on primates had been successful. “If all goes well, [we] will be planning for clinical trials with humans to start next year,” said the release. 

It only takes one injection Follow micdotcom

"When men imagine a female uprising, they imagine a world in which women rule men as men have ruled women."

Sally Kempton

I feel this is very important.

(via yourenotsylviaplath)

It’s been apparent to me for a while that most men can’t really imagine “equality.”  All they can imagine is having the existing power structure inverted.

I cannot decide whether this shows how unimaginative they are, or shows how aware they must be of what they do in order to so deeply fear having it turned on them.

(via lepetitmortpourmoi)

"Most men can’t really imagine “equality.”  All they can imagine is having the existing power structure inverted."

(via misandry-mermaid)

medicalschool:

It is currently difficult for physicians to detect small tumors and the precise boundaries of tumors during surgery. Fluorescent probes have improved tumor visualization, but these probes typically have high background signal or requires hours to illuminate. Recently, Kobayashi and colleagues developed a fluorescence probe- γ-glutamyl hydroxymethyl rhodamine green- that rapidly turns fluorescent green when it interacts with cancer cells, but not normal tissue (specifically when γ-glutamyltranspeptidase on the surface of cancer cells cleaves glutamate off the probe). When the probe is sprayed onto an in vivo mouse model of ovarian cancer, the probe activates within 1 minute, illuminating tumors <1 mm in diameter.

Movie: The hydroxymethyl rhodamine green probe is sprayed on a peritoneally disseminated SHIN3 ovarian cancer in a mouse. The movie was obtained with a regular camcorder.

Nothing like some Migas to get the day started!

Nothing like some Migas to get the day started!

erichmcbrian:

pikarar:

When you’re short and people pat your head.

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